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Category Archives: eClinical Team

ESTIMATE AT COMPLETION (EAC)

Project management is a continuous loop of planning what to do, checking on progress, comparing progress to plan, taking corrective action if needed, and re-planning. The fundamental items to plan, monitor, and control are timecost, and performance so that the project stays on schedule, does not exceed its budget, and meets its specifications.  Of course all of these activities are based on having an agreed upon Work Breakdown Structure (tasks/activities) on which to base the schedule and cost estimates.  During the planning phase of a project, the project manager with the assistance of the project team needs to define the process and procedures that will be used during the implementation phase to monitor and control the project’s performance.

Productivity in the pharmaceutical/biotech/medical device industry is going down. Some compounds have reached the billions expenditures cost without any guarantee that it will ever be approved or reach the market.  So how can we evaluate the performance of some of these clinical trials?

I will not go into details in the degree of project management activities managed and performed by a data manager since this can vary widely per company.  A good clinical data manager or manager of data management should be able to implement basic PM principles that will improve quality and timeliness of a clinical trial, regardless if the trial is fully outsourced (e.g. CRO performed most of the work).

You can find my article about the Role of Project Management in Clinical Data Management (2012) here for further reading.

So what is Estimate at Completion or EAC? or What is the project likely to cost?

There are several methods we could use to calculate EAC.

Let’s look at one formula. EAC =  AC (Actual Cost) + ETC (Estimate to Complete)  so what happens when you don’t know the ETC?

We could use the following formula to derive that value: ETC = (BAC – EV) / CPI =>>>>??? So what? More formulas? How do I get BAC or EV or CPI?

Let’s look at those in more details.

 BAC =>>>Budget at Completion (how much did you
budget for the total project?)
CPI =>>> Cost Performance Index (CPI): BCWP/ACWP

EV = Earned Value

Earned Value Analysis example for a phase 1 trial (*figures in the thousands / millions = fictitious  numbers)

The final clinical trial results includes 100 subjects. The estimated cost is $20 per subject.  That results in an estimated budget of $2000 (100 x 20). During the planning, the CRO indicated that would be able to enroll 5 subjects per week.  Therefore the estimated duration of the trial is 20 weeks (100 / 5)

EV blocks: From the project plan

Estimated Budget: $2000

Estimated Schedule: 20 weeks

Planned Value (PV): at the end of the trial is $2000

Variance between planned and actual at the end of the first week:

Based on the estimated scheduled, I should have 25 subjects enrolled. At $20 per subject, the planned value at the end of the week is $500 (25 x 20)

PV = $500

At the end of the first week, the CRO reports that he has enrolled 20 subjects  and the actual cost of that study is $450. With this information we can look at schedule and cost variance.

SV = EV – PV

SV = $400 – $500 = – 100 ($100 work of subject recruitment is behind schedule).

CV = EV – AC

CV = $400 – $450 = -50 ($50 work of the project is over budget)

*negative figures means bad.

Using early results to predict later results:

Schedule Performance Index (SPI)

SPI = EV/PV

SPI = 400/500 = .80

Cost Performance Index (CPI)

CPI = EV/AC

CPI = 400/450 = .89 –> over budget or expending more

These rations can be used to estimate performance of the project to completion based on the early actual experience.

Estimate to Completion (ETC)
ETC= (PV at completion) – EV)/CPI

ETC= (2000 – 400)/CPI

ETC = (1600/.89) =$ 1798 from end of week one (after 5 days) and it will take additional $1798 to complete the study

Estimate at Completion (EAC)

EAC = AC + ETC

EAC = 450 + 1798 = $2248

If nothing changes, based on the actual results at the end of the first week, the study is estimated  to cost $2248 (rather than the planned cost of $2000) and will take 20 percent longer.

The formulas assumes that the accumulative performance reflected in the CPI is likely to continue for the duration of the project.

You do not need to memorize all of these formulas. There are plenty of tools in the industry that does the computation for you. But if you do not have it available, you can use Excel, set-up your template and plug in the numbers.

Earned Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As per PMI – PMBOK definition, Cost management “…includes the processes involved in estimating, budgeting, and controlling costs so that the project can be completed within the approved budget.”   A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide).

We have shown you, that PM tools such as Earned Value  Analysis, can be applied to clinical trials or specific work break down (WBS) activities within the data management team.

Based on the above outcome of the project performance related to the schedule, the data manager should be able to determine if she should modify the current plan or revise the original plan.

It is a perfect tool for data managers and managers of data managers and could be part of your risk based processes.

If bringing efficiency, improving data quality and significantly reducing programming time after implementing CDISC standards is on your radar screen, I’d love to chat when it’s convenient. All the best.

Anayansi Van Der Berg has an extensive background in clinical data management as well as experience with different EDC systems including Oracle InForm, InForm Architect, Central Designer, CIS, Clintrial, Medidata Rave, Central Coding, OpenClinica Open Source and Oracle Clinical. SAS, CDASH/SDTM (CDISC standards implementation and mapping), SAS QC checks and clinical data reporting.

Source:

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide).

Notes from my PM class at Keller 2007-2009

Images – Google images

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RAeClinica – Clinical Staffing and Resourcing

RAeClinica – Clinical Staffing and Resourcing

RA eClinical Trial Technology, EDC, CTMS, and Technology Integration-Software Development – Web Development and Clinical Research Organization – Contract Research Organization

Source: RAeClinica – Clinical Staffing and Resourcing

 

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Team Collaboration and Conflict

Team Collaboration and Conflict

Conflict is inevitable and can be positive. Sometimes the person who disagrees actually does have a better way. Conflict is a natural result of change, but to manage it properly, we must focus on the facts, not the emotions. In other words; focus on the problem, not the person.

Ineffective team collaboration is one of the primary contributors to costly rework and delivery failure in many projects. Team collaboration is about sharing knowledge and reaching consensus within the team.

‘Problem-Solving Teams: Quality Circles’. I personally never read an article related to ‘conflict and team members with Quality Circles’ but they primary goal to foster an exchange of ideas and the use of basic tools such as brainstorming, checklists and Pareto chart, etc. were very familiar to me.

First, we should understand the major sources of conflict for a project. For instance, at the beginning of a project, project priorities, administrative procedures and schedules are the main sources of conflict. Towards the middle and end of a project, schedules create the most conflict, followed by resources, and technical issues. Personality conflicts are lower of the list, as are cost.

After we have clear understanding of what are the conflict and the sources, we can work on resolving those conflicts. Confronting the problem head-on without being confrontational towards the person is the best win-win situation. We examine alternatives with an open mind, and really agree on the best solution.

Ideally we want to build a positive relationship with positive statements all along. If you include a positive statement at the same time you address the problem, focus on the issue and be specific. For example, “I know it is not your fault but I trust that as a good team player, you will be here from now on.”

anayansi gamboa conflicts

In order to smooth the progress of conflict resolution, we should obtain feedback during the meeting and status reports; stress to the team and customer how critical it is to communicate any issues during the status meetings or at least to the project manager. Provide an explanation with the updated information.

Many projects do not deliver, and get canceled before they are completed. Team collaboration issues are very often the reason why projects fail, but if the right infrastructure is available to facilitate effective knowledge sharing among the team members, conflict will be minimize.

Source: {EDC Developer}

 

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Happy Holidays from RA eClinica

Thank you very much for being a great reader in 2014. What a whirlwind year it has been with many new posts  being released.

Until the 5th of January please contact us using the usual methods found here. If you’re unable to get through via the phone then please leave a detailed message including your company name and phone number and we will return your call as soon as possible.

Once again we wish you a happy holiday season. We look forward to sharing a successful and exciting 2015 with all of our customers and readers.

RA eClinical Solutions 2015

 

 

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A New Way to Collect Data – CDASH

There is a general consensus that the old paper-based data management tools and processes were inefficient and should be optimized. Electronic Data Capture has transformed the process of clinical trials data collection from a paper-based Case Report Form (CRF) process (paper-based) to an electronic-based CRF process (edc process).

In an attempt to optimize the process of collecting and cleaning clinical data, the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), has developed standards that span the research spectrum from preclinical through postmarketing studies, including regulatory submission. These standards primarily focus on definitions of electronic data, the mechanisms for transmitting them, and, to a limited degree, related documents, such as the protocol.

Clinical Data Acquisition Standards Harmonization (CDASH)

The newest CDISC standard, and the one that will have the most visible impact on investigative sites and data managers, is Clinical Data Acquisition Standards Harmonization (CDASH).

As its name suggests, CDASH defines the data in paper and electronic CRFs.

Although it is compatible with CDISC’s standard for regulatory submission (SDTM), CDASH is optimized for data captured from subject visits, so some mapping between the standards is required. In addition to standardizing questions, CDASH also references CDISC’s Controlled Terminology standard, a compilation of code lists that allows answers to be standardized as well.

Example: Demographics (DM)

Description/definition variable name Format
Date of Birth* BRTHDTC dd MMM yyyy
Sex** SEX $2
Race RACE 2
Country COUNTRY $3

*CDASH recommends collecting the complete date of birth, but recognizes that in some cases only BIRTHYR and BIRTHMO are feasible.

  • *This document lists four options for the collection of Sex: Male, Female, Unknown and Undifferentiated (M|F|U|UN). CDASH allows for a subset of these codelists to be used, and it is typical to only add the options for Male or Female.

The common variables: STUDYID, SITEID or SITENO, SUBJID, USUBJID, and INVID that are all SDTM variables with the exception of SITEID which can be used to collect a Site ID for a particular study, then mapped to SITEID for SDTM.

Common timing variables are VISIT, VISITNUM, VISDAT and VISTIM where VISDAT and VISTIM are mapped to the SDTM –DTM variable.

Note: Certain variables are populated using the Controlled Terminology approach. The COUNTRY codes are populated using ISO3166 standards codes from country code list. This is typically not collected but populated using controlled terminology.

Each variable is defined as:

  • Highly Recommended: A data collection field that should be on the CRF (e.g., a regulatory requirement).
  • Recommended/Conditional: A data collection field that should be collected on the CRF for specific cases or to address TA requirements (may be recorded elsewhere in the CRF or from other data collection sources).
  • Optional: A data collection field that is available for use if needed

The CDASH and CDICS specifications are available on the CDICS website free of charge. There are several tool available to help you during the mapping process from CDASH to SDTM. For example, you could use Base SAS, SDTM-ETL or CDISC Express to easily map clinical data to SDTM.

In general you need to know CDISC standards and have a good knowledge of data collection, processing and analysis.

With the shift in focus of data entry, getting everyone comfortable with using a particular EDC system is a critical task for study sponsors looking to help improve the inefficiencies of the clinical trial data collection process. Certainly the tools are available that can be used to help clinical trial personnel adapt to new processes and enjoy better productivity.

 

Source: EDCDeveloper

Anayansi Gamboa has an extensive background in clinical data management as well as experience with different EDC systems including Oracle InForm, InForm Architect, Central Designer, CIS, Clintrial, Medidata Rave, Central Coding, OpenClinica Open Source and Oracle Clinical.

 

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