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Monthly Archives: June 2015

Services: Data Management

Clinical trials play a key role in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device industry. We have Data Managers, EDC Developers and SAS Programmers available around the clock. Regardless of EDC tool {Medidata Rave, Medrio, Oracle InForm, OpenClinica, Oracle RDC or others}; we strive to provide you the best service by implementing CDISC standards from initial development.

RA eClinica Data Management Solutions

What others Clinical Research Organizations (CROs) consider ‘Unique‘ pages, we consider them ‘Standards‘. Why? We have developed most CDISC standards forms in most {EDC} systems so there is no need to reinvent the wheel.

What you get? Quick turn-around, cost-effective setup. We can setup trials in less time than most CROs as we use libraries from CDISC standards. Our SMEs then can concentrate on ‘Unique’, ‘Study-specific’ or more complex CRFs as per protocol.

For further information, please Contact Us!

 
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Posted by on June 15, 2015 in Freelancers

 

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Team Collaboration and Conflict

Team Collaboration and Conflict

Conflict is inevitable and can be positive. Sometimes the person who disagrees actually does have a better way. Conflict is a natural result of change, but to manage it properly, we must focus on the facts, not the emotions. In other words; focus on the problem, not the person.

Ineffective team collaboration is one of the primary contributors to costly rework and delivery failure in many projects. Team collaboration is about sharing knowledge and reaching consensus within the team.

‘Problem-Solving Teams: Quality Circles’. I personally never read an article related to ‘conflict and team members with Quality Circles’ but they primary goal to foster an exchange of ideas and the use of basic tools such as brainstorming, checklists and Pareto chart, etc. were very familiar to me.

First, we should understand the major sources of conflict for a project. For instance, at the beginning of a project, project priorities, administrative procedures and schedules are the main sources of conflict. Towards the middle and end of a project, schedules create the most conflict, followed by resources, and technical issues. Personality conflicts are lower of the list, as are cost.

After we have clear understanding of what are the conflict and the sources, we can work on resolving those conflicts. Confronting the problem head-on without being confrontational towards the person is the best win-win situation. We examine alternatives with an open mind, and really agree on the best solution.

Ideally we want to build a positive relationship with positive statements all along. If you include a positive statement at the same time you address the problem, focus on the issue and be specific. For example, “I know it is not your fault but I trust that as a good team player, you will be here from now on.”

anayansi gamboa conflicts

In order to smooth the progress of conflict resolution, we should obtain feedback during the meeting and status reports; stress to the team and customer how critical it is to communicate any issues during the status meetings or at least to the project manager. Provide an explanation with the updated information.

Many projects do not deliver, and get canceled before they are completed. Team collaboration issues are very often the reason why projects fail, but if the right infrastructure is available to facilitate effective knowledge sharing among the team members, conflict will be minimize.

Source: {EDC Developer}

 

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Employee motivation in the workplace

Employee motivation in the workplace

The job of a manager in the workplace is to get things done through employees. To do this the manager should be able to motivate employees. But that’s easier said than done! Motivation practice and theory are difficult subjects, touching on several disciplines.

In spite of enormous research, basic as well as applied, the subject of motivation is not clearly understood and more often than not poorly practiced. To understand motivation one must understand human nature itself. And there lies the problem!

Human nature can be very simple, yet very complex too. An understanding and appreciation of this is a prerequisite to effective employee motivation in the workplace and therefore effective management and leadership.

Our articles on motivation theory and practice concentrate on various theories regarding human nature in general and motivation in particular. Included are articles on the practical aspects of motivation in the workplace and the research that has been undertaken in this field, notably by Douglas McGregor (theory y), Frederick Herzberg (two factor motivation hygiene theory,) Abraham Maslow (theory z, hierarchy of needs), Elton Mayo (Hawthorne Experiments) Chris Argyris Rensis Likert and David McClelland (achievement motivation.)

Why study and apply employee motivation principles?

Quite apart from the benefit and moral value of an altruistic approach to treating colleagues as human beings and respecting human dignity in all its forms, research and observations show that well motivated employees are more productive and creative. The inverse also holds true. The schematic below indicates the potential contribution the practical application of the principles this paper has on reducing work content in the organization.

Motivation is the key to performance improvement

There is an old saying you can take a horse to the water but you cannot force it to drink; it will drink only if it’s thirsty – so with people. They will do what they want to do or otherwise motivated to do. Whether it is to excel on the workshop floor or in the ‘ivory tower’ they must be motivated or driven to it, either by themselves or through external stimulus.

Are they born with the self-motivation or drive? Yes and no. If no, they can be motivated, for motivation is a skill which can and must be learnt. This is essential for any business to survive and succeed.

Performance is considered to be a function of ability and motivation, thus:

Job performance =f(ability)(motivation)

Ability in turn depends on education, experience and training and its improvement is a slow and long process. On the other hand motivation can be improved quickly. There are many options and an uninitiated manager may not even know where to start. As a guideline, there are broadly seven strategies for motivation.

These are the basic strategies, though the mix in the final ‘recipe’ will vary from workplace situation to situation. Essentially, there is a gap between an individuals actual state and some desired state and the manager tries to reduce this gap.

Motivation is, in effect, a means to reduce and manipulate this gap. It is inducing others in a specific way towards goals specifically stated by the motivator. Naturally, these goals as also the motivation system must conform to the corporate policy of the organization. The motivational system must be tailored to the situation and to the organization.

In one of the most elaborate studies on employee motivation, involving 31,000 men and 13,000 women, the Minneapolis Gas Company sought to determine what their potential employees desire most from a job. This study was carried out during a 20 year period from 1945 to 1965 and was quite revealing. The ratings for the various factors differed only slightly between men and women, but both groups considered security as the highest rated factor. The next three factors were;

  • advancement
  • type of work
  • company – proud to work for

Surprisingly, factors such as pay, benefits and working conditions were given a low rating by both groups. So after all, and contrary to common belief, money is not the prime motivator. (Though this should not be regarded as a signal to reward employees poorly or unfairly.)

Source: {EDC Developer}

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Posted by on June 6, 2015 in Project Management

 

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Castor EDC – Data Management Made Easy!

Castor EDC – Data Management Made Easy!

DATA SCIENTIST {EDC DEVELOPER + STATISTICAL EXPERT + DATA MANAGER}

I recently was approached by a group of scientists that have developed a unique EDC system for researchers. Usually, you have a group of developers or gurus / geeks around some science major staff trying to understand how the EDC system they purchased works. But to hear that the system was actually developed by the scientists itself was news to me. So the email piqued my curiosity.  And as the email stated ‘our goal is make professional data management systems available for every researcher,’ I proceeded to spend time researching more.

As per my previous post, I like to ask the question about ‘names’ so here I asked the founder of Castor the same question…What is in the name besides letters? 

Castoris the Latin name for the beaver family, and the logo is designed as a safe haven (the wall around the dot) for data (the…

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Posted by on June 5, 2015 in Freelancers

 
 
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