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Monthly Archives: March 2015

The Only Three (3) [Programming] Languages You Should Learn Right Now (eClinical Speaking)

The Only Three (3) [Programming] Languages You Should Learn Right Now (eClinical Speaking)

On a previous article that I wrote in 2012, I mentioned 4 programming languages that you should be learning when it comes to the development of clinical trials.

Why is this important, you may ask? Clinical Trials is a method to determine if a new drug or treatment will work on disease or will it be beneficial to patients.

If you have never written a line of code in your life, you are in the right place. If you have some programming experience, but interesting in learning clinical programming, this information can be helpful.

But shouldn’t I be Learning ________?

Here are the latest eClinical programming languages you should learn:

  1. SAS®: Data analysis and result reporting are two major tasks to SAS® programers. Currently, SAS is offering certifications as a Clinical Trials Programmer.
    Some of the skills you should learned are:
  • clinical trials process
  • accessing, managing, and transforming clinical trials data
  • statistical procedures and macro programming
  • reporting clinical trials results
  • validating clinical trial data reporting

2. ODM/XML: Operational Data Modeling or ODM uses XML to build the standard data exchange models that are being developed to support the data acquisition, exchange and archiving of operational data.

3. CDISC Language: Yes. This is not just any code. This is the standard language on clinical trials and you should be learning it right now. The future is here now. The EDC code as we know it will eventually go away as more and more vendors try to adapt their systems and technologies to meet rules and regulations.

Some of the skills you should learn:

  • Annotation of variables and variable values – SDTM aCRF
  • Define XML – CDISC SDTM datasets
  • ADaM datasets – CDISC ADaM datasets

CDISC has established data standards to speed-up data review and FDA is now suggesting that soon this will become the norm. Pharmaceuticals, bio-technologies companies and many sponsors within clinical research are now better equipped to improve CDISC implementation.

Everyone should learn to code

Therefore, SAS® and XML are now cooperating. XML Engine in SAS® v9.0 is built up so one can import a wide variety of XML documentation. SAS® does what is does best – statistics, and XML does what it does best – creating reportquality tables by taking advantage of the full feature set of the publishing software. This conversation can produce report-quality tables in an automated hands-off/light out process.

Standards are more than just CDISC

If you are looking for your next career in Clinical Data Management, then SAS and CDISC SDTM should land you into the right path of career development and job security.

Conclusion:

Learn the basics and advanced SAS clinical programming concepts such as reading and manipulating clinical data. Using the clinical features and basic SAS programming concepts of clinical trials, you will be able to import ADAM, CDISC or other standards for domain structure and contents into the metadata, build clinical domain target table metadata from those standards, create jobs to load clinical domains, validate the structure and content of the clinical domains based on the standards, and to generate CDISC standard define.xml files that describes the domain tables for clinical submissions.

Need SAS programmers? We can help provide resources in-house / off-shore to facilitate FDA review by supporting CDISC mapping, SDTM validation tool, data conversion and CDASH compliant eCRFs.

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From Non-SAS Programmer to SAS Programmer Part II

From Non-SAS Programmer to SAS Programmer Part II

Previously, we wrote about how you can become a SAS Programmer with little or no programming background.

Today, I want to share a new link where you can download SAS Studio for free and practice. I have to give a thank to Andrew from statskom for the tip. Visit his blog for more SAS tips.

Here is a quick step on what you need in order to use the SAS University version for free provided by SAS:

1- Create a SAS profile and select the environment based on your operating system in order to download the SAS® University Edition. I  chose Oracle VirtualBox. The options available are: Oracle VirtualBox in Windows, Macintosh, and Linux operating environments.

2- You will receive an email where you can you download your SAS edition as per your selected environment on step 1. Click the link. It could take up to an hour for the entire program to download.

SAS University Edition

3-Go to https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads to install the OracleVirtualBox.

4-Add the SAS University Edition vApp downloaded on step 2 to VirtualBox step 3.

OracleVM

5-Create a folder for your data and results.

6- Start the SAS University Edition vApp

7-Open the SAS University Edition by opening your web browser and typing  http://localhost:10080. From the the SAS University Edition: Information Center, click Start SAS Studio.

There you have it! You have now access to SAS and can start practicing your new programming language.

anayansigamboa sas studio anayansigamboa sas studio anayansigamboa sas studio anayansigamboa sas studio

For more information about the SAS University Edition, see the FAQs and videos at http://support.sas.com/software/products/university-edition/index.html.

For Data Management and EDC training, please contact RA eClinical Solutions.

 

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